Maybe more is not the answer

I’m not an expert at lawn care.  I can actually count on one hand (okay one finger!) how many times I’ve actually mown the lawn.  My main job at our home right now is keeping the grass out of the flowerbeds, and my husband can attest to the fact that I fail miserably even at that!    

I walked barefoot through our front yard a few days ago, marveling at how lush and comfy it was.  It was tempting to roll around in it.  (I restrained myself!)  Later I went around to the backyard and had a completely different experience.  The grass there is thin, scraggly, and the last thing you want to put your bare feet in!  I wanted to fix it – and my best idea was covering the area with more grass seed in an attempt to fill in the spots.  It turns out that wouldn’t have been as effective as I would have liked.  Because instead of needing more grass, what the lawn really needed was for me to take care of what was already there.

Our backyard is fairly shady, we don’t water the lawn (ever!), and it’s played in hard by our two boys and various other neighborhood kids.  What it really needed was sunshine, water, and rest.

I approach so many situations thinking more is the answer, when in reality, I need to stop and make sure I am actually taking care of what I already have.

I need more friends.

No, I need to nurture the relationships of the amazing people already in my life.

I need more income.

No, I need to be more intentional and careful with what I have already been blessed with.

I need more time in the day.

No, I need to stop playing Candy Crush(!) and use my time more wisely.

I need more volunteers in my area.

No, I need to do everything in my ability to take care of the volunteers who are already part of my team.

 

This one really hit home for me during a recent discussion about growth.  Maybe instead of only focusing on asking more volunteers to be a part of our amazing ministry, I need to focus on the volunteers we already have.  Do we want more volunteers to join us?  Absolutely yes!  But I don’t want to throw them into a scraggly, thin volunteer experience where they have little chance of thriving.

If I do everything I can to honor my team, they will grow deeper roots into their roles.

If I recognize every person as an individual with unique needs, circumstances, and dreams, they will grow personally into who God created them to be.

And if they are growing and becoming more healthy, other people will be drawn to them and desire to be a part of what they are doing.

What have you been asking for “more” of?  What do you need to “take care of” instead?

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2 thoughts on “Maybe more is not the answer”

  1. Yulunda G. says:

    I absolutely love what you’ve said here. I have been really thinking about how I am treating the resources that I’ve been blessed with. I know that I have more than enough and am looking to see how I can be a better steward in so many ways.

    You hit on all of the main points for me, specifically income and time.

    Thank you and Blessings!
    Yulunda

    1. Heather says:

      Yulunda,
      I find myself with the “gimmies” so much more often than I’d like to admit! I have to remind myself repeatedly that I already have more than enough. Thanks for sharing how this impacted you!

      H

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